Do I Qualify?

Join a new clinical study testing an investigational treatment for patients with NASH, a severe form of fatty liver, aiming to slow down or stop the disease from progressing to cirrhosis & liver failure

Check your eligibility for the study

Do I qualify?

Take a more active role in your healthcare

You may Gain immediate access to a new investigational treatment

Benefit from close follow-up of your health by an experienced medical team

Study drug will be provided at no cost to you

Why Participate?

About the Clinical Study: ARMOR

ARMOR is a study testing whether an investigational medicine Aramchol is effective and safe for the treatment of NASH. The study is recruiting 2000 patients worldwide. It is a late-stage clinical study designed to further evaluate the effects of Aramchol on NASH and NASH-related complications.

In order to qualify for the study, you need to be 18 years or older and suffer from NASH with liver fibrosis. You will be evaluated for NASH using non-invasive methods and if found eligible, you will undergo a liver biopsy.

Once you have qualified for the study, you will be assigned either to a group that will receive Aramchol treatment or to a group that will receive a placebo (a pill that has no medical effect). You are twice as likely to receive Aramchol as the placebo in this study. During the study, your health will be followed closely for several years, through routine scheduled visits with your study doctor. 

If you qualify and join the study, you may receive reimbursement for time and travel and the study drug will be provided at no cost to you

Diagnosing NASH

When NASH is suspected, your doctor will generally begin the evaluation with routine blood tests that may suggest liver disease, but will not provide a definitive diagnosis of NASH.


Specialized, non-invasive imaging techniques, such as ultrasound and MRI may be performed to evaluate liver fat buildup and scarring, however, liver biopsy is currently the only means of diagnosing NASH and assessing the degree of liver scarring. A liver biopsy will be conducted as part of the ARMOR study qualification process.

A Serious Liver Disease

NASH (Non-alcoholic Steatohepatitis) is a chronic disease caused by fat buildup and liver inflammation. NASH may cause liver scarring (fibrosis), which can progress to severe scarring (cirrhosis) and lead to life-threatening complications, including liver failure and liver cancer.

About NASH

Who's at Risk?

NASH is closely linked but not restricted to obesity and type 2 diabetes, and is often silent and asymptomatic, allowing it to progress and develop undiagnosed. If you are obese or diabetic, you are at high risk of having NASH, and you probably don't know it.

How is NASH treated

There are currently no approved medications for NASH, and the main treatment option is a lifestyle change, including diet and exercise. 

NAFLD and NASH in Numbers

NAFLD is the number one Cause of chronic liver disease worldwide[1]

#1

NASH is the 2nd Leading cause of liver transplant in the U.S.[2]

2nd

Of diabetic patients have NASH[3]

37%

Of diabetic patients with NAFLD suffer have from advanced fibrosis[3]

17%

Of advanced fibrosis becomes life threatening within 2 year[4]

20%

Diabetic? Overweight?

Join a new clinical study testing an investigational treatment for patients with NASH, aiming to slow down or stop the disease from progressing to cirrhosis & liver failure

of diabetic patients have Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD)[3]

55%

What can I do?

ARMOR, a new clinical trial testing an investigational treatment for patients with NASH, aiming to slow down or stop the disease from progressing to cirrhosis & liver failure.

1. Global Perspectives on Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis.

2. Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis Is the Second Leading Etiology of Liver Disease Among Adults Awaiting Liver Transplantation in the United States

3.  The global epidemiology of NAFLD and NASH in patients with type 2 diabetes: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Younossi et al.2019

4. Sanyal 2019 The Natural History of Advanced Fibrosis Due to Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis: Data From the Simtuzumab Trials.

Do I Qualify?

Diagnosed with

Fatty Liver Disease?